March 2021: Trends in Estimated Load Impacts of COVID-19 Mitigation Policies on European and North American Electricity Consumption

March 2020 through Mid-March 2021

As previously discussed in the first of this blog series on April 13, 2020, as lockdown policies are enacted to help reduce the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), the Itron Forecasting Team is leveraging publicly available hourly load data for most North American Independent System Operators (ISOs) and a select set of European countries to build a picture of the load impacts by region. To assess the load impact of COVID-19 mitigation strategies, actual loads when many of these policies began are compared to baseline loads without COVID-19 policy impacts.

Across Europe and North America, the biggest estimated load reductions occurred in April 2020 with an estimated reduction in average daily load between -12.3% and -7.2%. Google Mobility data suggests a new normal of more people at home than pre-COVID.

For a detailed summary of the estimated load impacts, go to the forecasting website to download the latest COVID-19 Load Impact memo.

The Itron Forecasting Team will continue to post updated summary blogs and corresponding memos on the trends. Subscribe to our blog to be notified of new posts and contact us at forecasting@itron.com if you have further questions.

Estimated Daily Average Energy Impact Wedge


New Forecasting Brown Bag Webinars

Itron’s Forecasting group has conducted webinars on a variety of forecasting and load research-based topics for many years and continues to host new webinars every quarter. Past webinars were recorded and are available in a YouTube library.

To watch more recent recordings, you must be registered for the current year’s webinars. Our first brown bag of 2021 is on Tuesday, March 23 and is entitled “Accounting for COVID-19 Impacts in Budget Sales Forecasts When Economics Aren’t Enough”. COVID-19 has presented new challenges in forecasting with increases in residential sales and decreases in commercial sales. This brown bag session will review the impact of the pandemic on electricity usage, present our “COVID-19 modeling tricks” for estimating COVID-19 sales and revenue impacts and consider how to incorporate the future impacts as we transition back to “normal”.

Participation is free but prior registration is required. Each seminar lasts approximately one hour, allowing 45 minutes for the presentation and 15 minutes for questions. Seminars start at noon PDT.  If you are unable to attend a seminar or missed one, don’t worry! Your registration ensures that a link to the recording will be sent to you automatically.

Register Now!


A Journey in Tech: Spotlight on Katrina Polk

Today is International Women’s Day (IWD) – a global day dedicated to celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political accomplishments of women. Despite the barriers, women are at the forefront of pivotal innovation, amplifying their voices and taking on leadership roles like never before.

At Itron, we are fortunate to have strong, talented women that make up our team across the globe. In honor of IWD, we caught up with Katrina Polk, VP of product management for Networked Solutions, to learn about her journey in tech and celebrate her achievements.

Tell us a little bit of your background and how you got into the tech industry?

I graduated from college with a degree in Electrical Engineering from Clemson University. While finishing my degree, I really had no idea what specific field I wanted to pursue. I knew I didn’t want to go down a traditional engineering path and do lots of design, but would rather pursue an opportunity that would give me the ability to engage with people more regularly. Through my internship with Itron (formerly Schlumberger) I was able to exercise my technical muscles while engaging with customers as an application engineer in the product management group.

What made you pursue a career in the tech/energy field and what is the path you followed?

I fell into the energy field by necessity to gain some real-world experience before graduating from college. It just so happened that Itron had an office close to campus and through my Engineering Society (NSBE), I was able to make some connections that helped me secure an internship. My intention was not to work in the space longer than three years, but after more than 20 years I still find myself learning something new and working with an industry filled with amazing people.

What is your current role at Itron now and what was your pathway to that position?

Currently I am the Vice President of Product Management for our Networks Solutions business. I started my career in product management as an application engineer and spent most of my career serving different roles in product management. I spent a couple of years in R&D as a program manager before returning to a product management role. 

What has been your experience as a woman in a male-dominated field?

For me, it has been a pure pleasure. Working in a male-dominated field – and even more specifically a field like the energy space – there are a lot of situations where you can find yourself in front of a room full of men in which you have been asked to lead a discussion or be presented as the technical expert. I always look forward to those opportunities as it gives me a forum to prove that women are just as capable as anyone else and that as a woman, I could hold my ground in any situation. Over my many years, I was able to earn the respect of many and learn a lot from many more. 

How have things changed – or not – since you began your career?

Since starting in the industry more than 20 years ago, I am happy to say the number of women in this industry has grown tremendously. Not only are there young women entering the industry, but there are many more woman leading businesses in our industry. The number of women at the executive level across many companies in our industry is growing every year and it is very reassuring that women have solidified our place in this industry.

Many fear for the impact of COVID-19 on matters of gender equality. Do you have concerns about the pandemic impacting tech industries in this way?

On the contrary, when I think of how COVID-19 has impacted the workplace, I think it has created an opportunity for companies that may not have happened before. As most companies were forced to have a remote workforce through most of 2020 and into 2021, I think it has been a study of the impacts of remote workforce on any business. As a woman with children, it is hard for me to believe that anyone is better at multi-tasking than a woman. COVID-19 created the environment for women to flex those muscles and I believe the experiment was a huge success. What I think it taught us is that we can still be highly productive in remote workspaces which then creates a path to explore a workforce that is more diverse without restriction of geography. On the flip side, I think it is more important that companies make diversity and inclusion a core part of their cultural tenants to reinforce the importance as it can become difficult to be sensitive to the needs of others with more people working remote.

What should we do to help more women get a seat at the management table?

As women, we need to find opportunities to prepare the women behind us so that when opportunities arise, we can make sure that there are candidates available to be included in the discussion. It is hard to get people to the table if there isn’t a bench ready to step up. We must help encourage young women to pursue careers in tech, mentor those starting to enter the workforce and create a safe space for them to flourish and grow.

What advice would you offer young, aspiring women interested in tech?

Be fearless! You may be a unicorn in your industry, in your company or in your group, but you are the first of many to come. Seek knowledge, seek counsel and know your worth!

At Itron, we will be celebrating #InternationalWomensDay and women’s accomplishments all month long. Be sure to check back for more women empowerment posts and join the #choosetochallenge conversation on Twitter.


Animal, Societal and Artificial Cognition

How does a society think? For that matter, how does cognition occur in any organism or superorganism? What is the purpose of cognition? What can we learn from biology to make progress in artificial intelligence and to make wiser decisions as a society? Questions like these are driving a convergence of ideas from fields as diverse as complex systems science, evolutionary biology, information theory, cognitive science and computer science. One result is active inference, a Bayesian explanation of cognition and biological self-organization that applies to cognition in cells and animals, as well as to societies of these.

Active inference plays a central role in work I have done at Oregon State University (OSU), Environmental Sciences Graduate Program, where I am courtesy faculty. Perhaps in the future it will also play a role at Itron, as it seeks to improve and expand its capacity to deliver machine learning and artificial intelligence solutions. For example, active inference could be a natural fit for problems where multiple intelligent agents, such as intelligent IoT devices, must coordinate behaviors to reach a common goal.

I’m pleased to announce that ScienceX just published a short article summarizing the work I have done at OSU. The topic is societal cognition as it relates to societal transformation in the face of climate change, biodiversity loss and other pressing social and environmental problems.

As Itron Idea Labs explores opportunities in the world of machine learning and artificial intelligence, we welcome conversations with our utility customers and others regarding challenges that require advanced approaches. If you would like to schedule a conversation with the Idea Labs team on these topics, please feel free to contact us at Itronidealabs@itron.com.


Utility Prepayment Trends and Consumer Engagement

In some parts of North America, the utility market is becoming increasingly competitive when it comes to the delivery of electricity, gas, water or any combination of the three. Deregulation is one of the main drivers of this, but so are renewable energy sources. In deregulated states, as many as 25% of consumers leave their incumbent utility, switching to competitors for a number of reasons. There is also a movement underway where municipalities negotiate to offer alternative energy choices based on renewable energy sources through Community Choice Aggregation (CCAs).

Faced with these competitive headwinds, consumer engagement is more critical than ever for all utilities. Utility branding, being able to anticipate consumer’s needs and keeping them engaged fosters lasting relationships and loyalty. In addition, Advanced Meter Infrastructure (AMI) coupled with prepayment offers utility consumers flexibility and is one of the most direct customer engagement opportunities available to utilities.

Utilizing prepayment as an additional payment option allows direct consumer engagement for several segments and is a viable option for rental properties, college dorms and vacation homes. Prepayment also provides a way for consumers to address outstanding accounts without the out-of-pocket funding of large deposits, while still having access to affordable energy. Itron’s prepayment solution includes smartphone apps and web portals that offer flexible ways to pay for energy use and provide easy to understand energy usage information, creating happier, more satisfied customers. We are also able to leverage new prepayment capabilities through distributed intelligence applications at the meter. These applications can make the traditional North American AMI prepay solution much more effective and efficient.

Millennials and other environmentally conscience consumers are looking for more options to pay their bills and manage their energy. Making smartphone apps and web portals available allows a utility to provide meaningful energy consumption data that can help the utility’s customers learn about their energy usage and react accordingly, promoting energy efficiency and potentially improving their carbon footprint.

At Itron, we’ve been in the global prepayment market for more than 25 years and in 25 countries. As the newly dedicated North America prepay product manager, I recently spoke at the Prepay Energy Working Group (PEWG) meeting hosted by DEFG about Itron’s solution, with a focus on North America. Contact me at Chris.Germano@itron.com for more information.


Addressing Changes and Empowering Innovation in EMEA

Our industry is facing some big changes—such as new regulatory requirements for water, implementing 100% renewable generation and moving to a carbon-free society—while still addressing today’s challenges to deliver safe, reliable energy, water and city services at lower operating costs.

In the EMEA region – which is made up of Europe, Middle East and Africa – the utility sector is also impacted by what we call the “three Ds”, or rather, decarbonization, decentralization and digitalization.

Decarbonization means a growing renewable sector, leading to more sustainable renewable generation. Which is an exciting next step, however, renewables are highly intermittent – the industry challenge is to manage through those intermittent periods. In regard to decentralization, the reduction in the reliance of large generation plants and the dispersion of generation to smaller plants and renewables such as windfarms, solar biomass or hydro marine generation creates new challenges in how energy is distributed and how to address it. Furthermore, the implementation of new digital technologies to manage, monitor and operate systems in the transmission and distribution of energy and demand creates more efficient and effective data management, but also means companies are moving from hardware and products to service-based solutions.

Water management and the move to smart city technology are also two key areas of focus for EMEA. Due to increasing water scarcity, aging infrastructure and water loss/leaks, efficiently utilizing our most precious resource is more important than ever. Growing cities and urbanization also mean an emphasis on efficient, reliable and safe energy generation and ecosystems, as well as delivering more robust revenue analytics.

As we look to create a more resourceful future, it’s imperative that we factor in these areas to ensure lasting change and a positive outcome for our customers. So how do we plan to tackle these trends?

Join us during Itron Utility Week EMEA, March 16-17, 2021, as we discuss these challenges and more, bringing together industry experts, colleagues and thought leaders to learn from one another, share fresh perspectives and open the door to new solutions by empowering innovation and transforming challenge into opportunity.

Breakout sessions during the virtual event are organized into two tracks: Water Management and Smart City and Utility Solutions. Among the topics that will be covered are:

  • Leveraging multi-purpose networks to enable digital communities;
  • Reducing non-revenue water through leak detection;
  • Quantifying the value and benefits of distributed intelligence;
  • Accelerating electric vehicle adoption through grid analytics and charging management; and
  • Hearing from several city and community experts about how cities are navigating the pandemic and how connected city infrastructure and services can aid recovery.

The event will be offered virtually and at no charge. It will be available in English with subtitles in French, German, Spanish and Italian. Event registration is now open for Itron customers, partners and employees of municipalities, cities and utilities at all levels.

For more information about IUW EMEA: Empowering Innovation, visit www.itron.com/iuwemea.


January 2021: Trends in Estimated Load Impacts of COVID-19 Mitigation Policies on European and North American Electricity Consumption

March 2020 through January 2021

As previously discussed in the first of this blog series on April 13, 2020, as lockdown policies are enacted to help reduce the spread of COVID-19, the Itron Forecasting team is leveraging publicly available hourly load data for most North American Independent System Operators (ISOs) and a select set of European countries to build a picture of the load impacts by region. To assess the load impact of COVID-19 mitigation strategies, actual loads when many of these policies began are compared to baseline loads without COVID-19 policy impacts.

Across Europe and North America, the biggest estimated load reductions occurred in April 2020 with an estimated reduction in average daily load between -12.3% and -7.2%. This instance of the memos extends prior analyses that presents estimates of the load impacts by region, month, and the time of use period by adding pre- and post-hourly load shapes by season. A comparison of the hourly shapes provides a deeper understanding of how power consumption is evolving given current economic conditions and COVID-19 restrictions.

For a detailed summary of the estimated load impacts, go to the forecasting website to download the latest COVID-19 Load Impact memo.

The Itron Forecasting team will continue to post updated summary blogs and corresponding memos on these trends. Subscribe to our blog to be notified of new posts and contact us at forecasting@itron.com if you have further questions.


Bringing Our Premier Customer Event to EMEA

For many years, Itron has collaborated with cities and utilities in Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) to provide innovative, long-term energy and water solutions. I am delighted to announce that we are introducing Itron Utility Week, our premier customer event, to smart city and utility leaders in EMEA for the first time! Hosted virtually from March 16 – 17, 2021, we will bring together industry experts, colleagues and thought leaders to share fresh perspectives and open the door to endless possibilities through innovation.

IUW EMEA 2021 will include peer-led breakout sessions about technology, trends and best practices; insightful keynotes from industry leaders; engaging and thought-provoking panels; and an interactive product showcase of select Itron solutions. Tom Deitrich, Itron’s CEO and president, and Andrew Jones, Itron’s vice president of Sales for EMEA, will kick off the event with an opening keynote. Attendees will then have the opportunity to listen in on tailored breakout sessions, and learn from and have conversations with industry peers and Itron employees who have a firsthand understanding of the issues at play in the sector. Breakout sessions are organized into two tracks: Water Management and Smart City and Utility Solutions. Among the topics that will be covered are:

  • Leveraging multi-purpose networks to enable digital communities;
  • Reducing non-revenue water through leak detection;
  • Quantifying the value and benefits of distributed intelligence;
  • Accelerating electric vehicle adoption through grid analytics and charging management; and
  • Hearing from several city and community experts about how cities are navigating the pandemic and how connected city infrastructure and services can aid recovery.

At IUW EMEA, we look forward to building on our collective success to create a more resourceful world. The event will be offered virtually and at no charge. It will be available in English with subtitles in French, German, Spanish and Italian. Event registration is now open for Itron customers, prospects and partners.

Keep up with latest updates on the event through the Itron blog, and follow Itron and #IUWEMEA on social media.

For more information about IUW EMEA: Empowering Innovation, visit www.itron.com/iuwemea.


Snow Your Enemy

I have lived in New England my entire life. You may be unaware of this fact, but it snows here sometimes.

Snow can be wonderful. As a child, I shoveled my fair share of driveways. I delivered newspapers in the snow. And many times, I walked through a neighbor’s yard and climbed through a hole in the fence to get to a nearby school, which had a perfect hill for sledding.

Notwithstanding those idyllic images, snow creates unique challenges for solar generation forecasting.
There are two broad categories of solar forecasting. The first category is behind-the-meter (BTM) solar generation, which typically consists of rooftop solar panels. BTM has its own set of challenges including lack of visibility into the data itself. In most cases, the amount of energy that is generated, consumed, and/or sent back to the grid is not directly available to grid operators (at the Independent System Operator level) and it may or may not be available to utility distribution system operators. Because the data is often unavailable, the danger is that grid operators may over-commit generation resources on sunny days (when the BTM is generating a lot of power) and under-commit generation resources on cloud days (when the BTM is not generating much power at all).

The second category consists of grid-connected solar plants. In the area where I live, these facilities are often along the sides of highways. The panels tend to be fixed (i.e., they do not track the sun) and they face southward for maximum exposure to the sun as it traverses the southern sky from east to west.

In some cases, the historical generation for these grid-connect solar plants is available to us, along with the system’s total capacity. And, we have access to the useful weather concepts, such as:

  • Drybulb temperature
  • The ambient temperature
  • Cloud cover – the percent of the sky that is covered by clouds, ranging from 0 to 100, where 0 means a totally clear sky and 100 indicates a totally cloudy sky.
  • Solar irradiance – the amount of energy striking a surface on the earth, measured in watts-per-square-meter. The concepts are often Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) or Plane of Array (POA). A related concept is the maximum solar irradiance, which can be calculated from the latitude and longitude of a location. This does not account for the presence or absence of clouds, but merely provides the maximum value at the location and time based on a totally clear sky.

We tend to not have data on snow accumulation. Even if we did have that data, I am not sure that it would be especially useful. If you do not live in a snowy region, this may come as a surprise to you – the sky is typically cloudy when snow is falling. That is useful information because the forecast models would perceive a cloudy day and the generation forecast would be lower.

Eventually (and thankfully), the snow stops falling, at which point the sky may become totally clear. The forecast models may then predict a much higher generation forecast. Unfortunately, that forecast is likely to be wrong because of the accumulated snow covering the panels.

I visited a nearby solar array and I took the following photograph a full 24-hours after the snow stopped falling. The sky is essentially clear, but I estimate that these panels are producing exactly 0 kWh of electricity because they are entirely covered with snow. What are the factors that could influence whether the snow melts? Both increasing temperature and clear skies would certainly contribute.

It seems to me that the owners and operators of such facilities would benefit from low-tech solutions to clear the snow. There may be an entirely reasonable explanation as to why these companies do not proactively clear the panels. Maybe there are issues regarding potential damage to the panels? That seems plausible. Maybe it is too expensive and not economically worthwhile? But that seems doubtful.

I submit to you the following figure, which depicts the historical data from a solar plant in New England. I have clipped the energy units from the Y-axis to keep the data anonymous. The figure shows data from Nov. 1, 2020 through Jan. 31, 2021. The most salient point is that the observations in January 2021 barely exceed 0 for weeks, which means they are generating and selling roughly 0 kWh. This is entirely attributable to snow cover.

The days after snow falls create an inherently difficult forecasting problem. We do not know how much snow fell at the actual site of the panels. In fact, we may only have weather data for a station that is miles away. We do not know if the facility clears the panels. Even if the temperature increases sufficiently to melt the snow, we do not know how long that process may take. The temperature may increase sufficiently and then decreases again, thus freezing the partially melted snow.

These are challenging and intractable issues from the perspective of the forecaster. What can we do about this? First, we must adjust our expectations. In snowy regions, we cannot possibly expect to be as accurate in the winter as we are in the summer. Second, we could attempt a ‘persistence model’ which utilizes lagged loads. This will only be useful when real-time data is available, and the accuracy will certainly degrade as we extend into the forecast horizon. Third, we could attempt to code-up some logic regarding the temperature after a snowfall to account for snowmelt, but those relationships are not likely to be sufficiently robust or consistent to provide a useful signal for the model to discern.

Here is the coda to this tale. I visited the same solar array 3-days after the snow stopped falling. I estimate that the panels are roughly 5% clear. In other words, the array looks substantially the same as when I visited 2-days prior.

Snow is to solar panels what kryptonite is to Superman – it takes away all the power.


Summing and Averaging

The Sum function in MetrixND seems like a complex way to make adding difficult.

In a MetrixND transformation, numbers are added by joining variables with the “+” sign. Adding three variables is as simple as writing the following expression in the transformation editor formula box:

DataSource.Variable1 + DataSource.Variable2 + DataSource.Variable3

The complex way to add is using the “Sum” function. This function requires inserting the three variables separated by commas (,) as Sum function parameters, as shown below:

Sum(DataSource.Variable1,DataSource.Variable2,DataSource.Variable3)

Technically speaking, the Sum function requires five extra characters to do the same work as the traditional “+” sign.

So, why does MetrixND include this function?

In the situation where variables have missing values, the calculation using the “+” sign results in a missing value. In other words, a number plus a missing value equals a missing value.

100 + MISSING = MISSING

While the Sum function behaves the same, the Ignore Missing option changes the behavior to produce a value. In other words, the Sum function with the Ignore Missing option selected means that a number plus a missing value equals a number.

100 + MISSING = 100

To activate the Ignore Missing option, check the Ignore Missing box in the transformation editor as shown below.

The Ignore Missing options works with the following functions:

  • Sum
  • Avg
  • Max
  • Min

It doesn’t matter whether you use traditional math operators or the functions when data is complete. However, when the dataset has missing values, the functions and Ignore Missing options may be the difference between forecasting a number and forecasting a MISSING.

Complexity has its purpose.


Itron Named in 2020 Gartner Market Guide for Meter Data Management

As a trusted, proven leader in meter data management (MDM), Itron manages data from more than 45 million meters representing 100+ energy and water companies across six continents. We provide data management outcomes for smart utilities and cities around the globe, while delivering mission-critical data to support applications for meter-to-cash and beyond—all through an enterprise-wide, highly scalable Itron Enterprise Edition (IEE) MDM solution.

Itron is excited to announce that we were recently cited as a Representative Vendor in the Gartner Market Guide for Meter Data Management (login required), which provides insight into the MDM market as well as on MDM solutions providers.

Key findings of the guide include:

  • “Metering has evolved from being just a component of the revenue cycle processing (meter to cash) to an enterprise function that supports multiple core processes such as product innovation, customer management, asset management and commodity management.
  • The meter data management (MDM) market has matured, but solutions continue to be offered by vendors with different legacies (metering, enterprise software, Internet of Things [IoT]).
  • MDM is a vertical version of an IoT platform built specifically for the metering purpose. Consequently, MDM vendors are aspiring to become more generic IoT platform providers, while IoT platform vendors are eyeing the utility market to address vertical metering needs.
  • Access to accurate, low-latency granular consumption data ingested, persisted and disseminated by MDM is critical for utility digital transformation.”

To learn more about our meter data management system (MDMS) for smart utilities and cities around the globe, visit Itron.com.

Market Guide for Meter Data Management, December 2020. Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, express or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.


Challenges in Removing Obstacles on the Path to IoT

Companies such as Cisco, Ericsson and other players have been projecting the exponential expansion of connected IoT devices for years. From the first connected device in 1990 (a toaster connected by TCP/IP) to 26 billion connected devices in 2019, technologies for communication and connectivity continue to evolve. However, with expansion comes the challenge of growth.

With standards-based code embedded on the modules and with the use of common data objects, Itron Idea Labs is working with IOTEROP, a company offering IoT device management solutions, to promote a common architecture from device to cloud so every device developer and every IoT solution designer can enjoy an accelerated path to deployment.

On Jan. 19, I was able to join a panel of IoT experts as part of the Cellular IoT for Smart Cities webinar to discuss how Itron Idea Labs is collaborating with IOTEROP and others to surgically remove obstacles and enable the IoT explosion.

During the panel, device management was the first obstacle to be addressed. Panelist Matt Hatton of Transforma pointed out the need for no touch provisioning in use cases where a city or service provider has millions of sensors spread out in a diverse geographic area. Imagine a router upgrade in your own home. Your televisions, both laptops, the tablets, gaming devices, everybody’s phone, the doorbell and who knows what else will need to be provisioned to reconnect with the IoT - and that’s just a single home. Hence the need for a truly scalable, truly no-touch process for device manufacturers, application developers, businesses and cities. Stephen Lurie, a panelist from IOTEROP, pointed out that Itron understands the need for device management that scales from “a business or human or processes standpoint.”

Another obstacle raised by the panel was data exchange. Envision a city with multiple departments all gathering data in their own way. Sharing that data among departments and with organizations outside the city can be crucial to enabling essential use cases. To address this challenge, the key is standards! And Itron is engaged with standards organizations who are making a difference. As an example, I described Itron’s work to define common functions and processes using a public repository of data objects with defined attributes (OMA ISPO objects). Using the LwM2M standard and the work done by the OMA Specworks organization, a public repository of data objects with their attributes is now available. IoT solution developers can align around open standards and standardized data models, working within this framework to ensure their data collection adheres to standards that will enable sharing.

A third obstacle to IoT explosion was the fact that security is an ever-moving target. Hatton mentioned the need for over-the-air firmware updates to ensure that IoT devices stay current. For this example, I described our work with module makers (Quectel, Ublox, Sequans, Sierra, Nordic, etc.) to ensure the ability to embed a full IP stack with keys, protocols and secure firmware extensions. This built-in stack on the module becomes a foundation for a device developer, reducing the expertise needed in underlying protocols and allowing developers to focus on building their solution. This architecture promotes a single SKU that works anywhere in world, delivering a global footprint with the added benefit of reducing the attack area on each device.

Itron’s decades-long experience deploying Industrial IoT devices in the field helps us bring standards, security and scalability together for our industry and the developer community, and the evolving landscape changes from an intimidating maze to a well-lit, clearly marked pathway for deployment and adoption of IoT solutions.

View a recording of the Cellular IoT for Smart City: An Evolving Landscape panel, with my presentation visible at minute 34.


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